How to adapt & thrive in a new household

The first day, week and possibly even month of any new job can be an understandably nervous time. But the last thing your new employer wants to see is you not performing to the best of your abilities because you’re distracted by nerves.

This is exacerbated if your employer happens to be entertaining guests while you’re finding your feet, but is applicable regardless.

To help you with this process, we’ve compiled our top tips for settling into your new role with haste, so that you can begin to prove your worth straight away.

Each household will have its own rules, pace and expectations, so recognising and adapting to those is imperative. But the only way to do that is to ask questions – if anything isn’t clear, or you aren’t sure what’s expected of you, no reasonable employer will mind you seeking assurance. But where possible, this should be from fellow members of staff rather than your employer themselves, who will likely prefer not to engage in this process.

The time to ask these questions is when tasks are first being explained to you, not when you’re actually carrying out your duties. This may not always be possible but should be adhered to whenever it is.

During your probationary period, it is always good practice to carry a small notebook and pen. There will be a lot to take in and no matter how hard you concentrate, without a physical reminder it will be nigh on impossible to remember everything that is said.

Your manager or senior member of staff will not mind being asked questions – in fact chances are they will actively encourage it – but they do not want to have to repeat themselves.

It is important that you remain open minded and flexible with regards to the way things are done. It may be that you feel you know a better methodology or a more efficient way of carrying out a task, but the time to volunteer that information is not during your induction. Show a willingness to listen and learn.

There will be inevitable criticisms, but do not take these to heart. No matter the calibre of your training or number of years in the role, each household is different and likes things to be done a certain way. The criticism is never personal, so should never be taken as such. Try to look at any feedback as an opportunity to improve and expand your knowledge.

Depending on the way things are run, you may or may not be formally introduced to all your fellow members of staff, but it is prudent to familiarise yourself with the whole team and learn everyone’s names. Not only will this provide you with companionship but you’ll have immediate allies and people to turn to if you’re unsure of anything. The best time to do this is in your own time – during breaks or once you are enjoying some free time, never whilst on duty.

If you are considering taking a position as a household staff member, get in touch with Melissa Offer Private Staffing today to assess your suitability.

Similarly, if you would like to hire a household staff member, get in touch with Melissa Offer Private Staffing to discuss the bespoke service we offer.